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The Race to Find Justice

By Megan Coleman

On June 9, 2020, Chief Judge Mary Ellen Barbera of the Maryland Court of Appeals issued a Statement on Equal Justice under Law. The poignant statement was issued in the midst of the protests that spread like wildfire across the nation, emboldening individuals to stand up and be heard about the racial injustices that have been plaguing communities of color for centuries.

Chief Judge Barbera recognized that injustices against people of color are not new and that sadly, little progress has been made to eliminate racial disparities. Read More…

What it’s Like to Argue an Appeal from Home

By John Grimm

Practicing law these days reminds me of the apocryphal ancient curse, “may you live in interesting times.” The times are definitely interesting, and one interesting thing I did earlier this month is argue an appeal from my living room.[1] For the foreseeable future, it seems that the Maryland appellate courts will be operating remotely with oral arguments being handled by video conference, so I wanted to share my thoughts on the experience. Read More…

What Kim Kardashian and Prince William Can Teach Us About Remote Oral Arguments

By Derek Stikeleather

The COVID-19 pandemic has given us all innumerable “new normals.” Even appellate practitioners, whom the Daily Record recently described as “relatively unscathed” by the pandemic, have had to change how they conduct business. This is especially so when it comes time to present oral arguments. Read More…

COVID-19 pandemic presents issues of contract interpretation—how have Maryland appellate courts recently handled those issues?

By Brad McCullough

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected every facet of our lives and has raised many legal issues. Every day, lawyers’ e-mail inboxes are bombarded with messages touting webinars and publications addressing those issues. Does your insurance policy cover business disruption caused by the pandemic? Does the pandemic implicate the force majeure provision in a contract? Is a party’s performance of a contract excused by principles of impossibility, impracticability, or frustration of purpose? Those are hot legal issues at the moment, but ultimately those issues will be resolved by application of fundamental legal principles. Foremost among those principles are rules of contract interpretation. Whether a particular force majeure provision in a contract covers pandemics, or whether a specific insurance policy covers losses arising from a disruption of business caused by the pandemic, are questions that will be answered by interpreting the specific contractual provisions in play. Similarly, whether the purpose of a contract has been frustrated, or its performance made impossible, will hinge on the intent and expectations of the parties, as reflected by the terms of their contract. How do Maryland’s appellate courts address those issues? Two recent decisions, one by the Court of Appeals and another by the Court of Special appeals, provide some insight. Read More…

Facing Type: A Tour of the Court of Appeals’ List of Suggested Fonts for Briefs

By John Grimm

The Daily Record recently informed me that the Governor’s stay at home order has left appellate lawyers “generally unscathed.”[1]  “Indeed,” I thought to myself, while downstairs my eleven-month-old patiently waited a full workday as I edited a brief.  Actually, working from home has left at least this appellate lawyer a bit scathed, so I’ve had little time to study the appellate news lately.  And what news there is seems to be all about courts’ new emergency procedures anyway, so in this post, I am going to address a topic that is irrelevant to current events, but which is a preoccupation for many appellate lawyers: typography. Read More…

Washington Post v. McManus and Clear Channel v. Department of Finance:  Important Lessons from Maryland’s State and Federal Court’s in Assessing Content and Means Based Abridgements of Speech

By Alan B. Sternstein

Two First Amendment cases recently decided in state and federal courts in Maryland interestingly parallel each other factually but reach different results as to the constitutionality of the governmental actions challenged in each case.  The facts and First Amendment issues in Clear Channel Outdoor, Inc. v. Department of Finance, No. 2910 (Md. App. Sept. Term, 2018) (“Clear Channel”),  which the Court of Special Appeals decided on January 29, 2020, bear a useful and instructive comparison to those in the Fourth Circuit’s decision in Washington Post v. McManus, No. 19-1132 (4th Cir. Dec. 6, 2019) (“Washington Post”), which was the subject of a post earlier this year on the Maryland Appellate Blog.  Read More…

Fourth Circuit Fires Away at Defective Felon-in-Possession Convictions

By Stuart BermanGuest Contributor

In June 2019, the Supreme Court held in Rehaif v. United States, 139 S.Ct. 2191 (2019), that in federal prosecutions of illegal aliens for knowingly possessing a firearm, the government “must show that the defendant knew he possessed a firearm and also that he knew he had the relevant status when he possessed it.” As expected, Rehaif was quickly applied to other categories of “prohibited persons,” including one of the most commonly-prosecuted federal crimes, “felon in possession” – knowing possession of a firearm that had moved in interstate or foreign commerce by a person previously convicted of a crime punishable by more than one year of imprisonment, under 18 U.S.C. § 922(g)(1).

The trickier issue was whether Rehaif would be applied retroactively. Read More…

Update: Maryland Court of Special Appeals, For Now, Appears to Adopt Televised “Zoom” Oral Arguments for Public, and Other Appellate Court Developments

By: Michael Wein

As a previous piece last week noted,  the four (4) appellate courts potentially affecting Maryland practitioners postponed their March and/or April oral arguments, because of the coronavirus health crisis.  We now have more information on what three (3) of the courts have adopted, as at least interim solutions, while retaining some flexibility of a “wait and see” approach depending on the status of the crisis in early May. Read More…

Oral Arguments Postponed Left and Right Due to Coronavirus…At Least in Maryland, How Long Should this Last?

By: Michael Wein

It began with court and jury trials being postponed throughout the State of Maryland.  But the past 10 business days have seen a remarkably swift progression in the postponement of appellate oral arguments in all Maryland and related Federal Courts due to the novel coronavirus. Read More…

POSTPONED: Maryland Impact Decisions 2020

UPDATE, March 12, 2020: The previously scheduled April 1 event, “Recent Impact Decisions of the Maryland Appellate Courts” has been taken off the calendar due to COVID-19 concerns. We hope to reschedule the event and, if so, will re-post the event on the blog.