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Governor Appoints Booth to Court of Appeals, Wells and Gould to Court of Special Appeals

Governor Larry Hogan issued this press release today:

Brynja McDivitt Booth has been appointed to the Court of Appeals, 1st Appellate Circuit, which includes Caroline, Cecil, Dorchester, Kent, Queen Anne’s, Somerset, Talbot, Wicomico, and Worcester Counties. Ms. Booth is an attorney and shareholder of Booth, Booth, Cropper & Marriner, P.C. and has extensive appellate experience. Ms. Booth is the president of the Maryland Municipal Attorneys Association. She is a frequent speaker on appellate practice and land use. She received her B.A. from Bucknell University, cum laude, and her J.D. from Washington and Lee University School of Law, cum laude. She served as a law clerk to the Honorable William S. Horne, Circuit Court for Talbot County.

Edward Gregory Wells had been appointed as an at-large member of the Court of Special Appeals. Judge Wells has served as a judge on the Circuit Court for Calvert County since 2012. Prior to his appointment to that Court, he served as a judge on the District Court of Maryland serving three southern Maryland counties: Calvert, Charles, and St. Mary’s. He also served as Master for Domestic Relations and Juvenile Causes for Calvert County. Judge Wells also served as an Assistant Attorney General in the Criminal Appeals Division of the Office of the Attorney General and was the first African-American to serve as Calvert County State’s Attorney. He received his B.A. from the College of William and Mary and his J.D. from the University of Virginia, School of Law.

Steven Bennett Gould has been appointed to the Court of Special Appeals, 7th Appellate Court (Montgomery County). Mr. Gould is a founding partner of Brown Gould Kiely, LLP. He is a trial lawyer and civil litigator who has litigated, arbitrated, and tried numerous complex commercial litigation cases. He has served as the co-chairperson of the Commercial Litigation Section of the Bar Association of Montgomery County, and is active in his synagogue, Congregation B’nai Tzedek, where he has served on the board of directors and currently holds the position of general counsel. He received his B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania, and his J.D. from Boston University School of Law, cum laude.

 

Three Nominated for Eastern Shore Seat on Court of Appeals

An end is in sight for the vacancy on the Maryland high court. The Judicial Nominating Commission today forwarded to Governor Hogan three nominees to replace Court of Appeals Judge Sally Adkins, who retired in October. Read More…

Four Added to the Applicant Pool for the Court of Appeals Vacancy

By Diane E. Feuerherd

After re-advertising, the Appellate Judicial Nominating Commission noted four additional applicants for the Court of Appeals (First Appellate Judicial Circuit) vacancy:

Brynja McDivitt Booth, Booth, Booth, Cropper & Marriner (Easton)

Joyce Elizabeth Jones, Jones & Suh, LLC (Church Hill)

Carla Lynn Knight, Lynn Knight Law (Centreville)

Jane Chace Miller, Law Office of Jane Chace Miller (Chester)

These four individuals join Christopher F. Drummond, Judge Christopher B. Kehoe, and Judge Brett W. Wilson, who each applied in August of 2018. The Commission intends to meet on January 14, 2019 to review these applications.

Eleven Nominated for Court of Special Appeals: December 2018

By Diane E. Feuerherd

Today, the Appellate Judicial Nominating Commission advanced a total of eleven names for the two pending vacancies on the Court of Special Appeals (At-Large and Montgomery County), from the impressive list of lawyers and judges who applied in August. Read More…

Maryland Court of Appeals Vacancy Re-advertised

By Diane E. Feuerherd

As previously reported on the Maryland Appellate Blog, Judge Sally D. Adkins’s retirement left a vacancy on the Court of Appeals, for the First Appellate Judicial Circuit. In August, three submitted applications for the seat – Christopher F. Drummond, Judge Christopher B. Kehoe, and Judge Brett W. Wilson. But, according to the Maryland Courts website, “[t]his vacancy is being re-advertised for new applicants.”

**Correction: As originally posted, this blog post incorrectly stated that the Appellate Judicial Nominating Commission had nominated all three existing applicants. In fact, the Commission has yet to make any nominations for this vacancy. This correction has been made.

For direct updates on the Appellate Judicial Nominating Commission’s consideration of applications for this vacancy and others, see the Maryland Courts website.

Judge Matt Fader to Become COSA’s Next Chief Judge

Governor Larry Hogan announced today that Court of Special Appeals Judge Matt Fader will become the Court’s next chief judge. Current Chief Judge Patrick Woodward reaches the mandatory retirement age of 70 next week. The press release states: Read More…

Williams & Connolly Partner to Be Nominated to Fourth Circuit

This afternoon, the White House issued a press release announcing President Trump’s intent to nominate Allison Jones Rushing to replace Judge Allyson K. Duncan of North Carolina. Earlier this year, Judge Duncan announced that she would take senior status upon the confirmation of her successor. Read More…

Introducing the Applicants for the Court of Appeals and Court of Special Appeals: August 2018

By Diane E. Feuerherd

Three vacancies on Maryland’s appellate courts, arising from the forthcoming retirements of Judge Sally D. Adkins of the Court of Appeals (1st Appellate Judicial Circuit, covering the Eastern Shore), Chief Judge Patrick L. Woodward of the Court of Special Appeals (Montgomery County), and Judge Deborah Sweet Eyler of the Court of Special Appeals (At Large), collectively drew 27 applicants, whose names were published this afternoon.

Read More…

Two new judges confirmed to Fourth Circuit

By Steve Klepper (Twitter: @MDAppeal)

Even though South Carolina and Maryland each have three seats on the Fourth Circuit, you’ll be more likely to draw at least one South Carolina judge than a Maryland-based judge for your three-judge panel.

The U.S. Senate yesterday confirmed Julius “Jay” Richardson and U.S. District Judge Marvin Quattlebaum as U.S. Circuit Judges for the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit, which hears federal appeals from Maryland, Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina. Both new judges are based in South Carolina. Judge Quattlebaum will need to wait a few weeks to take his seat, because Judge William Traxler, whom he is replacing, does not take senior status until August 31. Judge Richardson replaces Judge Dennis Shedd, who took senior status in January. Information on the new judges’ backgrounds is in this prior post.

As friend-of-the-blog Kevin Elliker pointed out in a Twitter exchange, the Fourth Circuit appears to have its most-ever number of judges in the pool: 15 active judges, plus three senior judges still serving on panels. Although Congress expanded the Fourth Circuit from 12 judges to 15 judges in 1990, a Virginia seat (held by Chief Judge Roger Gregory) was not filled until 2000. Judge James Wynn‘s North Carolina seat was vacant from 1994 to 2010 (not a misprint). Judge Pamela Harris‘ seat here in Maryland was vacant from 2000, when Judge Murnaghan died, until 2009, when Judge Andre Davis was appointed. And, compared to other circuits, unusually few senior judges have kept hearing cases.

Now we’ll have three, all from South Carolina: Judges Shedd and Traxler, plus Judge Clyde Hamilton, who took senior status in 1999. It appears that Judge Hamilton is still on panels in cases submitted on brief, but that he has not been on oral argument panels since 2015.

Two Fourth Circuit Nominations in One Day

By Steve Klepper (Twitter: @MDAppeal)

Jane, get me off this crazy thing… called legal news. It’s not even 2:30 p.m., and already the Southern District of New York has appointed a special master to review documents seized from Michael Cohen, and Bill Cosby was convicted on retrial.

It’s actually below-the-fold legal news that that the White House today announced the Administration’s thirteenth wave of judicial nominees, which includes two nominees to the Fourth Circuit. Both would presumably maintain their chambers in South Carolina. Still, if they’re confirmed, you could check in at 8:30 a.m. in Richmond some morning to discover that either or both is on your panel. Read More…